Scam alerts

There's a variety of ways online attackers may attempt to gain your personal or financial information, or exploit you for financial gain.

Please be aware that Australia Post will never:

  • Ask you to click on an email link to print off a label to redeem your package
  • Email or call you to ask for personal or financial information including password, credit card details or account information
  • Send you an email asking you to click on an attachment
  • Email you to reconfirm your physical mailing address by clicking on a link
  • Call or email you out of the blue to request payment

If you receive any suspicious emails, please:

Check this page regularly for updates on the scams targeting Australia Post customers.

Examples of fraud and scams

Below are some examples of the more common types of fraud and scams that you should be aware of.

Click an option below to learn more.

Fake money order or cheque Click to expand Click to collapse

If you're selling an item or service, the scammer sends you a fake money order, travellers cheque, bank draft or foreign cheque with a higher amount than the agreed price.

You're then asked to send back the excess amount via an online banking transfer or a wire transfer.

The scammer is hoping you won't discover the cheque has bounced or the money hasn't arrived before you send the 'refund'. Once you send money to the scammer, you won't get it back.

Phishing attacks Click to expand Click to collapse

Phishing attacks are a common form of attack used by cyber-criminals to trick users to disclose sensitive, personal or financial information, including account credentials, for fraudulent purposes.

A phishing attack involves the use of a website set up by criminals to look like the website of a well-known organisation, such as an Australian financial institution or government agency. The aim of these attacks is to defraud or steal personal information from the victim.

The purpose of a phishing email is to encourage the reader to click on the web link, login and provide their personal information.

Phishing web sites often appear identical to the legitimate website except:

  • the web domain and URL will be different to the legitimate organisation
  • there is no padlock in the address bar or an incorrect placement of the padlock on the page
  • content often contains spelling and grammar mistakes
  • it has an invalid digital certificate

Phishing emails often try to create a sense of urgency by saying:

  • "your account will be closed down unless you log on"
  • "a large sum has been debited from your account - you need to provide your account details to confirm the charge is incorrect"

Parcel delivery payment Click to expand Click to collapse

You receive a call from someone claiming to be an Australia Post employee or a staff member from a post office. The caller advises you that Australia Post has been unsuccessful in delivering a parcel to you and redelivery can be arranged after you make a payment.

The payment amount may vary and the scammer may ask for payment in a number of ways such as credit card or international wire transfer.

Australia Post does not make calls like this, and they should be ignored.

Scams targeting Australia Post customers

January - February 2016 Click to expand Click to collapse

Example of scam email that is missing Australia Post branding, has poor grammar and spelling

Example scam email that has poor grammar and unprofessional wording

July - August 2015 Click to expand Click to collapse

Australia Post continues to warn customers of scam emails which are circulating at the moment, one in which advises customers to clink on a link, print out a voucher and take into a post office to pick up collection and another which advises to download a receipt of a parcel and reconfirm your home address.

Post does not request customers to download any link to reconfirm your home address nor does it ask customers to print out a voucher for parcel collection.

Sample scam email missing Australia Post branding, with poor grammer and incorrect punctuation.

February - March 2015 Click to expand Click to collapse

Australia Post continues to warn customers of scam emails which are circulating at the moment, one in which advises customers to clink on a link, print out a voucher and take into a post office to pick up collection and another which advises to download a receipt of a parcel and reconfirm your home address.

Post does not request customers to download any link to reconfirm your home address nor does it ask customers to print out a voucher for parcel collection.

Sample scam email missing Australia Post branding, using click bait to click on a link, references to our "Company" rather than Australia Post

Sample scam email with missing Australia Post icon (broken link), missing Australia Post branding, overly informally written (e.g. "We noticed a parcel was left atour office for you and the address on file keeps showing the wrong address."

Employment offer Click to expand Click to collapse

This scam involves an offer of a job working from home for Australia Post. The sender has an email address of svsort@auspost-us.com (or similar).  You may also be sent an employment contract - see example shown below. 

Example of scam employment contract

 
Australia Post does not send emails to customers offering jobs or providing employment contracts.

  • If you receive this email, please delete it.
  • If you have fallen victim to the scam, please call the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) on 1300 795 995 to report the matter to SCAMwatch.

For further information about this scam, visit SCAMwatch.

July to December 2014 Click to expand Click to collapse

Australia Post continues to warn customers of emails which advise that a "courier" was unable to deliver a parcel to their address. Australia Post does not request customers to remit a payment for parcel collection, nor does it charge customers for holding a parcel.

Scroll down to see some examples of scam emails.

Scam sender addresses

The email sender has a prefix of info@ and a suffix of either com, net, orgbiz or info.  For example - info@aupostalservice.info, info@auspost-portal24.net or info@austpost-trackforce.org.

  • aupostalservice
  • auspostalservice24
  • aupostal-service
  • au-postalservice
  • auspostal-service
  • austpost-trackforce
  • austpost-tracktrace24
  • auspost-portal
  • aupost-tracktrace
  • auspost24
  • auspost-trackit24
  • auspost-track24
  • auspost-portal24
  • auspostweb24
  • auspost-home
  • auspost-trackit
  • australia-post
  • eparcel-tracking
  • au-stpost
  • aust-pst
  • auspost-eparcel
  • austp
  • austpst
  • auspost-tracking24

  • auspost-tracking

  • aupost-tracking

  • aust-track

  • auspost-parcel

  • auspost-delivery

  • aus-tpost

  • aust-post

  • aus-post
  • au-post
  • autpost
  • aut-post
  • aust-post
  • aust.su, aust.pw
  • delivery-service
  • postaust
  • postaut
  • postaust
  • postconfirm
  • post-daily
  • postline-au

What you should do

These scam emails contain malware that encrypts your file system and demands payment for the system to be unencrypted (also known as 'ransomware' or a 'phishing' scam). Prevention is the best approach. It's vital you know the warning signs of a phishing scam.

If you receive this email, please delete it.

If you suspect your computer or network is infected by ransomware, seek technical advice immediately. For details on free software to unlock your PC (Cryptolocker malware unlocker), visit Stay Smart Online.

Examples of scams

scam email example missing Australia Post branded letterhead

Scam email example showing incorrect "From" email adress (info@aust-post.org)

Scam email example showing incorrect grammer "There is undelivered packet" and missing Australia Post branding

Scam email example of attempted delivery with no tracking number provided and missing Australia Post branding

Scam email example showing incorrect "From" address (supp1@auspost.net) and with incorrect Australia Post branding

Scam email example with incorrect "From" address (tracking@austpost-delivery.org) and incorrect grammer (You do have undelivered box) and missing image

Scam email example with incorrect grammer (There is undelivered packaging) and sentence casing (lower case first word of sentence)

July 2014 Click to expand Click to collapse

Australia Post is aware of a current scam targeting customers through cold calls from individual(s) purporting to be from the Australian Tax Office. The callers are telling recipients that they owe tax and if it isn't paid onto a Load&Go card, they're going to face jail.

If you receive a call like this, please do not do as the caller says. Ensure your bank account and personal information are secure by using a bookmarked link or type in the web address yourself.

If you receive a call from an unsolicited caller requesting access to your computer, transfer money or your personal details, just hang up.

Warning signs

  • You receive an email or a phone call from someone saying they're from your bank, asking you about recent activity on your credit card or account.
  • You're asked to confirm your credit card and bank account details by return email, visiting a website or over the phone.
  • The caller or the email claims there has been fraudulent activity found on your bank account, or your card has been cancelled.
  • You may be advised to contact a fake fraud investigations body, and discouraged from contacting your bank or credit union.

February - April 2014 Click to expand Click to collapse

Example of an email scam reported during February and March. We've highlighted some of the ways to spot this type of scam email.

scam email example with incorrect "From" email address (info@aust-post.biz) and incorrect grammer (This is automatically e-mail message)

Media contact

Media enquiries only:
Contact the Australia Post National Media Line on 03 9106 6666.

Customer enquiries
Please call our Customer Contact Centre on
13 13 18.